1961 Chrysler Imperial Crown with Removable Top Plum by Lucky Toys

1961 Chrysler Imperial Crown with Removable Top Plum by Lucky Toys

1961 Chrysler Imperial Crown with Removable Top Plum by Lucky Toys

The 1961 Imperial Crown model was a convertible that was representative of the peak of convertibles. It featured a wholly new front end which had free standing headlights placed on cut away front fenders and very distinct tail fins. Imperial was the Chrysler Corporation’s luxury automobile brand between 1955 and 1975, with a brief reappearance in 1981 to 1983.
The Imperial name had been used since 1926, but was never a separate make, just the top-of-the-line Chrysler. However, in 1955, the company decided to spin Imperial off as its own make and division to better compete with its North American rivals, Lincoln and Cadillac, and European luxury sedans called the Mercedes-Benz 300 Adenauer, the Mercedes-Benz 600, and the Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud. Imperial would see new body styles introduced every two to three years, all with V8 engines and automatic transmissions, as well as technologies that would filter down to Chrysler corporation’s other models.
The 1961 model year brought a wholly new front end with free-standing headlights on short stalks in cut-away front fenders (a classical throwback favored by Virgil Exner, used commonly in the 1930s Chryslers. He would continue his look with the modern Stutz), and the largest tailfins ever. Inside, the Imperial gained an improved dash layout with an upright rectangular bank of gauges. The pillared four-door sedan was cancelled and would not return until the 1967 model year. With the downsizing of Lincoln, at 227.1 inches (later increased to 227.8 inches in 1963), the Imperial would once again be the longest non-limousine car made in America though 1966. Sales fell to 12,258, the result of bizarre styling and continued poor quality control.
If you want to get this Lucky Toys 1/18 1961 Imperial Crown with Removable Top Plum model, you will love just how precise the details are on this diecast model and how they all come together to make the most perfect replica ever.

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