1971 Jaguar E-Type Diecast by Yat-Ming

1971 Jaguar E-Type Diecast by Yat-Ming

1971 Jaguar E-Type Diecast by Yat-Ming

The Jaguar E-Type or the Jaguar XK-E for the North American market is a British sports car, which was manufactured by Jaguar Cars Ltd between 1961 and 1975. Its combination of beauty, high performance, and competitive pricing established the marque as an icon of 1960s motoring. At a time when most cars had drum brakes, live rear axles, and mediocre performance, the E-Type sprang on the scene with 150 mph and a sub-7 second 0-60 time, monocoque construction, disc brakes, rack and pinion steering, independent front and rear suspension, and unrivaled looks. In fact, the E-Type was based on Jaguar’s own famed racer, the Type D, which had won the world’s most prestigious sports-car race three consecutive years (1955-1957) and, as such, it was the first production vehicle not to use a separate body bolted onto a chassis, instead employing the racing design of a body tub attached to a tubular framework, with the engine bolted directly to the framework.
The E-Type Series 3 was introduced in 1971, with a new 5.3 L twelve-cylinder Jaguar V12 engine, uprated brakes and standard power steering. Optionally an automatic transmission, wire wheels and air conditioning was available. The brand new V12 engine was originally developed for the Le Mans series. It was equipped with four Zenith carburettors. The final engine was claimed produced 203 kW (272 hp), massive torque and an acceleration of 0-60 mph in less than 7 seconds. Although this bhp figure was reduced in later production. The short wheelbase FHC body style was discontinued and the V12 was available only as a convertible and 2+2 coupé. The newly used longer wheelbase now offered significantly more room in all directions. The Series 3 is easily identifiable by the large cross-slatted front grille, flared wheel arches, wider tyres, four exhaust tips and a badge on the rear that proclaims it to be a V12. Cars for the US market were fitted with large projecting rubber bumper over-riders (in 1973 these were on front, in 1974 both front and rear) to meet local 5 mph (8 km/h) impact regulations, but those on European models were considerably smaller. US models also have side indicator repeats on the front wings. There were also a very limited number of six-cylinder Series 3 E-Types built. These were featured in the initial sales procedure but the lack of demand stopped their production. When leaving the factory the V12 Open Two Seater and V12 2 ± 2 originally fitted Dunlop E70VR − 15 inch tyres on 15 × 6K wire or solid wheels.
The Jaguar factory claimed that fitting a set of Jaguar XJ12 saloon steel-braced radial-ply tyres to a V-12 E-Type raised the top speed by as much as 8 mph. The production car was fitted with textile-braced radial ply tyres. This fact was reported by the Editor of Motor magazine in the Long-term test of his E-type edition dated 4 August 1973, who ran a V-12 Fixed head for a while.
Robson lists production at 15,290.
In March 2008, the Jaguar E-Type ranked first in a The Daily Telegraph online list of the world’s “100 most beautiful cars” of all time.
In 2004, Sports Car International magazine placed the E-Type at number one on their list of Top Sports Cars of the 1960s.
The much-loved E-Type has received incredibly high praise since its first production in 1961. It was named as the fastest road car of its time and the quickest to accelerate, and has since been called the most beautiful car of all time by several publications and critics. Thankfully for collectors, more than 60,000 of these cars were made; and thankfully for enthusiasts, Yat-Ming have produced a diecast model which reflects the prowess of the E-Type perfectly.

1971 Jaguar E-Type Diecast by Yat-Ming

1971 Jaguar E-Type Diecast by Yat-Ming

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