1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302 #83 Al Costner by Greenlight

1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302 #83 Al Costner by Greenlight

1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302 #83 Al Costner by Greenlight

Check out this 1:64 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302 (#83 Al Costner) diecast model car. The Mustang boss 302 is a high-performance variant of the Ford Mustang originally produced by Ford in 1969 and 1970, alongside its more powerful sibling the Boss 429 Mustang.
The Camaro/Mustang rivalry had begun in 1967 with the introduction of the Chevrolet Camaro by General Motors. The Camaro was the largest threat to the lead Ford had in the “pony car” field, a market segment largely created by Ford with the introduction of the Mustang in mid-year 1964. The performance of the Mustang with 289 and 390 engines was not up to the Camaro, with its small block and big block V8. In an effort to improve the Mustang’s image Ford made a 428 Cobra Jet V8 and a Ford Boss 302 engine optional for the 1968 mid-year and 1969 models, respectively. The Boss 302 C.I.D. (Hi-Po), engine was a created by combining a Ford Windsor, (Assembly Plant), 302 cubic inch engine block with “large valve” Ford Cleveland, (Assembly Plant), 351 cubic inch engine cylinder heads. This optional engine, and indeed the entire vehicle package, including handling and aerodynamic aids, was made available for the express purpose of meeting the homologation guidelines to compete in the SCCA Trans-Am series, which limited engine displacement to 302 C.I.D., (5.0L), in order to compete. The Boss 429 Mustang was born in a similar way, except with the intent of homologating Ford’s new “semi-HEMI” 429 C.I.D. engine (to race in NASCAR, instead of Trans Am. The much larger engine in the Boss 429 reflects the less restrictive engine displacement limits of NASCAR at the time.
The Boss 302 Mustang was designed by Larry Shinoda, a former GM employee. The car featured a reflective “c-stripe”. The fake air scoops in the rear quarter panel fenders of the regular production 1969 Mustangs were eliminated on the Boss 302, (only), models. A black horizontal rear window shade and a blackout hood were both options. It was one of the first production models with a front spoiler and rear deck wing. The name “Boss” came about when Shinoda was asked what project he was working on, he answered “the boss’s car” because the project was a secret. Also Shinoda had called it the “Boss” as an homage to the new President of Ford Semon “Bunkie” Knudson who had brought Shinoda over from GM’s Chevrolet Division after Knudson had left.
The Boss 302 is reproduced as a model and toy, with diecast models including Greenlight, Hot Wheels, Matchbox, and Ertl’s “American Muscle”, and many others. It is recognizable by the “hockey stick” side stripe, rear louvers and chin spoiler (although those features can also signify a Boss 429 Mustang). The 1970 is available, but there are also some 4-headlight 1969 models as well.

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