2004 Pontiac GTO Blue “Car & Driver” 1/18 by Autoworld

2004 Pontiac GTO Blue "Car & Driver"  1/18  by Autoworld

2004 Pontiac GTO Blue “Car & Driver” 1/18 by Autoworld

American Muscle 2004 Pontiac GTO Coupe (Car & Driver) 1:18 Scale in Blue Bermuda with Black Interior, made by Autoworld. Limited to only 1250 diecast cars worldwide.   The Pontiac GTO is an automobile that was built by Pontiac from 1964 to 1974, and by Holden in Australia from 2004 to 2006. The original Pontiac® GTO® was an immediate performance icon until the end of 1973, launching the muscle car genre. The first generation GTO was a muscle car of the 1960s and 1970s era. Although there were earlier muscle cars, the Pontiac GTO is considered by some to have started the trend with all four domestic automakers offering a variety of competing models. The car was essentially third-generation Holden Monaro, a powerful coupe hailing from Australia. The VZ Monaro-based GTO was Pontiac’s first captive import since the 1988–1993 Pontiac LeMans. The V2/VZ Monaro was a 2-door coupe variant of the Australian developed VT/VX Holden Commodore. The Commodore had, in turn, been developed by enlarging the European designed 1994 Opel Omega B, which was marketed in its original form in the U.S. from 1997 to 2001 as the Cadillac Catera. The Monaro was also exported to the United Kingdom as the Vauxhall Monaro and to the Middle East as the Chevrolet Lumina SS. Back after a 30 year absence, the legendary Pontiac® GTO® returned as a rear-wheel drive two-door coupe. The GTO was assembled by GM’s Holden subsidiary at Elizabeth. It was equipped with the 5.7 liter LS1 V8 engine for the 2004 model year, the same engine found in the concurrent model year Chevrolet Corvette, with a choice of a 6-speed manual transmission or a 4-speed automatic. Changes from the Australian-built Monaro included bracing additions to the body to meet U.S. crash standards, a “corporate Pontiac” front facia, new badging, “GTO” stitching on the front seats, and a revised exhaust system. GM Engineers benchmarked the sound of the 1964 GTO held in the Pontiac historical collection, as well as other LS1-powered vehicles, while working with the exhaust vendor to tune the system. The effort was made to make the new GTO invoke the same sound as the original while still meeting the noise threshold required by some states. The 2004 GTO exhaust was a true dual system that followed the original Monaro exhaust routing, thus both tailpipes exited on the driver side of the vehicle. General Motors claimed performance of 5.3 seconds to 60 and a 13.8 second quarter mile time, which was closely verified by several magazine tests. With simple smooth lines, it could have been mistaken for a less powerful coupe. What it lacked in sleek looks, it made up for under the hood.

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