1/12 Scale Franklin Mint 1963 Corvette Stingray Limited Edition in Fine Pewter

1/12 Scale Franklin Mint 1963 Corvette Stingray Limited Edition in Fine Pewter

1/12 Scale Franklin Mint 1963 Corvette Stingray Limited Edition in Fine Pewter

1963 Corvette Stingray Limited Edition in Fine Pewter by Franklin Mint 1/12 Scale Approximately 15 (43.2cm) long x 7 3/4″ (19.7 cm) wide. Only 1,000 will ever be created. The Chevrolet Corvette (C2) (C2 for Second Generation), also known as the Corvette Sting Ray, is a sports car that was produced by Chevrolet for the 1963 to 1967 model years.
The first-ever production Corvette coupe, a futuristic fastback, sported an unusual styling element for its time period – a divided rear window. The rear window’s basic shape had been originally conceived by Bob McLean for the Q-model. The rest of the Sting Ray design was equally stunning. Quad headlamps were retained but newly hidden – the first American car so equipped since the 1942 DeSoto. The lamps were mounted in rotating sections that matched the sharp-edged front end with the “eyes” closed. The Corvette continued to use hidden headlamps until the C6 model debuted in 2005. Coupe doors were cut into the roof, which made entry/exit easier in such a low-slung closed car. Faux vents were located in the hood and on the coupe’s rear pillars; functional ones had been intended but were cancelled due to cost considerations. The fastback design was later adopted by another GM car, the third-generation Buick Riviera that debuted in 1971, with the “Boattail” nickname applied to the larger Buick design.
The 1963 Corvette Sting Ray not only had a new design, but also newfound handling prowess. The Sting Ray was also a somewhat lighter Corvette, so acceleration improved despite unchanged horsepower. 21,513 units would be built for the 1963 model year, which was up 50 percent from the record-setting 1962 version. Production was divided almost evenly between the convertible and the new coupe – 10,919 and 10,594, respectively – and more than half the convertibles were ordered with the optional lift-off hardtop. Nevertheless, the coupe wouldn’t sell as well again throughout the Sting Ray years. In fact, not until 1969 (by which time the coupe came with removable T-tops) did the closed Corvette sell better than the open one. Equipment installations for 1963 began reflecting the market’s demand for more civility in sporting cars. – the power brake option went into 15 percent of production, power steering into 12 percent. On the other hand, only 278 buyers specified the $421.80 air conditioning; leather upholstery – a mere $80.70 – was ordered on only about 400 cars. The beautiful cast aluminum knock-off wheels, manufactured for Chevy by Kelsey-Hayes, cost $322.80 a set, but few buyers checked off that option. However, almost 18,000 Sting Rays left St. Louis with the four-speed manual gearbox – better than four out of every five.

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